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20121211
20121211
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)
. how we really globalize. globalization is a big company game. i can go to china and not be afraid. going to africa and compete with the chinese. i can go to russia and say i can manage the risk-reward equation. so that's where a lot of new consumers are and i would say that is a core competency of a multibusiness big company like g.e. so i'd say it's more than those two but those two are important. >> rose: you once said to me tell me what the global economy will look like and the domestic economy will look like and i can can tell you what g.e. will do. >> uh-huh. >> rose: look ahead to the global economy today and tell me how you see it, where it's going and pra what are the prospects for growth? >> i think the world always revolves around a couple fundamentals. one is where are the people? demographics rule. at times when the u.s. grew the fastest was times when the population was also growing the fastest. so the fact there that there's a billion new consumers joining the middle-class in the next five or ten years, you bet be with them. the second is the cost of materials so bas
to 2030. they say the u.s. won't be the world's only superpower. the council says china will pass the u.s. economically a few years before 2030. the council's analysts say the u.s. will remain unrivaled in its ability to orchestrate all aspects of power including the military it the analysts say the japanese economy will gradually shrink as the population ages and the labor force contracts. they say japan will retain fourth place in terms of overall power, trailing only the u.s., china and india. the council experts say asian countries such as india and indonesia are likely to boost their military power. but they warn of an arms race in asia. if the u.s. scales back its military commitment in the region. they say some tionmay begin developing nuclear weapons. new car sales are fueling china's economy. sales grew 8.2% in november from the same time last year. officials say nearly 1.8 million units were sold last month. japanese firms lost out after chinese consumers boytted their vehicles over a territorial dispute. they saw a slight improvement last month. total new car sales this china
-wage china when he was on the board of gateway computer. he wants to turn michigan into the same low wage environment we see in china. >> reporter: looking around here live at the scene at the capitol, you have teachers who took the day off from school to demonstrate. you have united auto workers. we saw several big trucks from the teamsters. a lot of people sympathetic to efforts of these workers out here making their voices heard, expressing their discontent with what has happened. governor snyder told me a short time ago this is in response to a ballot initiative you remember failed in november. that was proposition 2. it would have put collective bargaining in the michigan constitution. it would have made it untouchable by any kind of new legislation. that is part of the complaint from the democrats. they say it is politics and retribution. also the complaint you hear from democrats it happened so fast. it happened without the public having time for input. what you see on the lawn is something governor snyder referenced f there wasn't enough time for public input you wouldn't have all
. >>> japanese auto parts makers are trying to find new business channels at a major trade fair in china. they're struggling to survive in the world's biggest car market amid souring relations between the two countries. 30 japanese suppliers are among 4,000-plus companies from around the world showcasing products and services in the fair that started obtuse. chinese consumers are shunning japanese products since a bilateral territorial dispute broke out in september. some have seen sales plunge in china by half. others remain unable to keep plants going. >> translator: i think the chinese market has big potential. we're pinning our hopes on china, being able to keep staying afloat. >> japanese officials making active sales pitches at the fair to potential clients in the u.s., europe, and china. >>> the nobel prize winner is eager to get back to work. >> he shared this year's nobel prize in physiology or medicine with a british scientist. his family joined him at the ceremony in stockholm. >> he received the award for his work with stem cells. >>> japanese children are scoring better in math a
.s. in general is looking positive. and the u.s. is creating a lot more jobs. china is still positive in the fourth quarter. china is going to show a slow and steady improvement. so we need those. >> higher expectations stronger in the likes of taiwan, india and brazil. let's go back to where you say they're weakest. greece, italy, spain, the netherlands. this is a very weak feature, indeed. how bad in it? >> it's bad. the eurozone is the global economic problem now. if you look at asia where i just returned from, both countries are feeling optimistic. but they seem to be inwardly focused now by being a triangle of china, india, indonesia. we're not seeing a great benefit into europe as we did before. for instance, germany is looking pretty pessimistic. based on its lack of export performance to places like china. >> yeah. when the bundes bank came out and shortly downgraded forecasts, how is the employment picture? if you've got a relatively healthy china and the u.s. consumer bounce back, wouldn't that help germany? >> it certainly would. germany is relatively flat in terms of the e
think the world will look like. it's fascinating. it shows china on the rise, the west in decline and china overtaking the united states in size of economy by the year 2030. here are the key findings of the new intel report. it's interesting reading. a majority of the world's population by 2030 will be out of poverty for the first time in world history. there will be wars over food and water and natural resores. populations will continue to rise and there will be recurring global economic crises but when you think about this, you think about how far we're going here. you've got asia, china in particular will be dominant. it will be stronger than its been anytime since middleages. there will be no more pax americana as its known. china will be a big driver and india will be growing like china is today. they talk about how the world is changing. it's like no other time since the french revolution. remember in the late 18th century, the industrial revolution, except it's happening more quickly. it's taking a tenth of the time for china and asia to rise quickly. let me read to you som
look to china let's focus on belgium. >> the opposite is going to happen. china frob blee will be starving, and they will have more girls than boys. but belgium is where we should be pointing our focus. >> you know why? the chocolate. it is the chocolate. >> they are wired and ready to go. congressman, serious question, what do we need to do to be number one? take out all of these other countries. just a suggestion. not that we should, but we should. >> look, the reality is go back to the population bomb. the reality is technology has leaked us forward. how do you make sure that we as a country do the things whether it be making sure we are competitive and i won't go into my tax discussion, but we need to rebuild our tax code to be competitive with the world. >> the congressman is right. i think that we always end up -- america creates the stuff that makes the world go. we have the most freedom. people come here to make things. will this be the next steven jobs from china? i don't know. if you have a creative idea there is the ability to find capital and you are not regula
. ultimately it helped to work. a lot of people supported that. people say, apple, they do business in china. these workers are virtually slaves. i will never own the stock. if that is the case they missed out on an investment unless they bought two weeks ago, an investment of a lifetime. so where do you find the way to draw the line? i've got to tell you something, this thing is urban outfitters is more reflective of society, not a company of really the have garrity in society today amongst young people is at the point where i talk about this all the time. i think pendulum has swung so far it can't get much further. lori: do you the think the stock surge up 34% year-to-date, urban outfitters because of shocking nature of stuff? kids in way to rebel and spicy putting it as nicely as i can? what is going on with the store that is generating interest? >> they are ahead of the curve. real hip store called supreme. they have a location in l.a. and soho. urban bought them. it was a brilliant move. this was underground success. they sell it throughout everywhere. it is a real smart retail play. i
did a report last year a few months ago about china and india's investment, the rapid level in which they are investing from pre-k through college. there will have more in china and any of them the entire u.s. work force. we're focused on a global economy. those from harvard are competing globally with students from china, germany, brazil. tavis that transform the way we think about education? do you think your role as straining american leaders? are you looking at attracting global leaders? >> there are so many questions. let me address a few of them. there are numerous kind of statistics that we have a preeminence of college graduates in our populations and levels of participation. we are losing this. we have once last three of the world's college graduates. that is an interesting illustration of a shift in the dynamism. i see this when i travel. a huge commitment to public resources. huge energy to enthusiasm of higher education. india wants 1500 new universities by 2020. alicia's in a meeting about hong kong this week. i learned that hong kong university is expanding undergraduat
report suggests china is getting ready to surpass the u.s. economy. >>> plus -- >> this is the place where lisa was buried. >> cnn goes inside the search for da vinci's famous muse. ♪ ♪ [ engine revs ] ♪ [ male announcer ] oh what fun it is to ride. get the mercedes-benz on your wish list at the winter event going on now through december 31st. [ santa ] ho, ho, ho! [ male announcer ] lease a 2013 e350 for $579 a month at your local mercedes-benz dealer. [ sniffs ] i took dayquil but my nose is still runny. [ male announcer ] truth is, dayquil doesn't treat that. really? [ male announcer ] alka-seltzer plus fights your worst cold symptoms, plus it relieves your runny nose. [ breathes deeply ] awesome. [ male announcer ] yes, it is. that's the cold truth! since ameriprise financial was founded back in 1894, they've been committed to putting clients first. helping generations through tough times. good times. never taking a bailout. there when you need them. helping millions of americans over the centuries. the strength of a global financial leader. the heart of a one-to-one relati
panels in the world in china, also bought one of the solar panels. so they have brought a lot of money in for that small college. we need to have consistency in america and committing ourselves to preserving the environment, protecting us from global warming which is real and we need leadership coming from the white house every day saying we need to do something about global warming. that hasn't happened yet. my hope is in president obama's second term he'll be the leader of the world and not lagging behind the other nations in doing something about global warming. >> you're a nuclear engineer at one point, promoted nuclear energy. how do you make the distinction between nuclear energy for good use, good purposes, and for bad use? and iran's argument that they are creating nuclear energy for power and not as a threat to the united states, speak to the link between energy and national security. >> i was in charge of a development of the second atomic submarine and i was an early nuclear physicist. that was my graduate work. i had what's convinced then and now nuclear power for peaceful
] how can power consumption in china, impact wool exports from new zealand, textile production in spain, and the use of medical technology in the u.s.? at t. rowe price, we understand the connections of a complex, global economy. it's just one reason over 75% of our mutual funds beat their 10-year lipper average. t. rowe price. invest with confidence. request a prospectus or summary prospectus with investment information, risks, fees and expenses to read and consider carefully before investing. >>> welcome back to squawk. happy monday. today in the "wall street journal" suggesting netflix could end up doomed with its success with children. netflix just for kids get more popular. companies like viacom get accurate. companies provide netflix with most of its content in a kids' focused section. the journal says at some point the suppliers will probably want to charge netflix more or they might even stop selling to netflix. that's been a huge problem for them when it comes to contend more broadly. >> time for the global markets report. kelly evans standing by in london. you rise above over
room to run, more so from palladium and the positive data from china. back to you. >> sharon, thank you very much. breaking news to brian shactman, nfl bounty case. brian. >> nine months after this story broke, paul announced he's vacating all penalties on four players. they are exonerated. the key here is the players were not in favor of tagliabue doing this. spent three years, 50,000 pages of documents indicting players. they exonerated them. two of them might return to play this season. >> thank you very much, brian shactman. >> to nasdaq, bertha coombs following big movers there. we have the advance there as well. >> we do. nasdaq 100 outperforming thanks to apple's recovery. off of the highs of the day. nonetheless it is contributing about a third of the outside impact to the nasdaq 100. facebook will be added tomorrow. watch that going into the close. it will be trading in the nasdaq, emphasis trades over at nyc. yahoo! has a mobile app for mail. today at a four-year high. that stock continues momentum. couple of deal-based stocks, trip adviser with folks at liberty interactive ta
, numbers okayed here, heating up in china. people thought europe was contained, and it feels that way now. people looking past the headlines whether it's the fiscal cliff or europe. i mean, there's a lot of doom day sayers out there, and it makes sense, but it seems like everything right now is contained, and the trade is up to the upside. david: right. liz mentioned the fed decision coming up, should be hearing about it tomorrow. what's the market expecting from the fed? in what way will they be excited or disappointed? >> well, i think the market, if you look at the options market, the flows into the ten year treasuries, it's implying 85 billion per month. the reason i say that is right now, deals, what, 165 #, if that was not the case, yields should be up 180, maybe 183 right now so all the flow right now is pointing to 85 or 90 billion per month. liz: okay. none of us is going to fight the tape here, larry. we'll talk to you in a moment when the s&p futures close, but in the meantime, going to the panel, daifd. david: sam, chief equity strategist, and charles bitterman, trim tabs inve
expensive to do business in countries like china. our workers have become even more productive. our energy costs are starting to go down here in the united states. and we still have the largest market. so when you factor in everything, it makes sense to invest here, in america. and that's one of the reasons why american manufacturing is growing at the fastest pace since the 1990s. and thanks in part to that boost in manufacturing, four years after the worst economic crisis of our lifetimes, our economy is growing again. our businesses have created more than 5.5 million new jobs over the past 33 months. so we're making progress. [applause] we're moving in the right direction. we're going forward. so what we need to do is simple. we need to keep going. we need to keep going forward. we should do everything we can to keep creating good middle- class jobs that help folks rebuild security for their families. [applause] and we should do everything we can to encourage companies like daimler to keep investing in american workers. and by the way, what we shouldn't do -- i just got to say this -- wh
since april of last year. the trade gap with china did hit an all-time high. will fred industries is the latest offering special one-time payments. the company is boosting its quarterly dividend 20% to 16 and a half% a share payable on december 28. the website planning to streamline its operation and focus its resources on engagement innovation and customer satisfaction. that is the latest from the fox business network. giving you the power to prosper. ♪ with thinkorswim by td ameritrade. use the news links breaking stories with possible breakout stocks, options with potential opportunity, futures and forex with in-depth analysis. it an all-you-can-eat buffet for all things trading. thinkorswim by td ameritrade. it doesn't just deliver news. it's making news. trade commission free for 60 days, plus get up to $600 when you open an account. governor of getting it done. you know how to dance... with a deadline. and you...rent from national. because only national lets you choose any car in the aisle... and go. you can even take a full-size or above, and still pay the mid-size price.
going to compete with china with 1.3 billion people? the answer is we can have the entire world at our disposal by creating conditions that the best people in the wormed can come to the united states and study. >> and stay and start businesses. >> two, then we have to focus on faction, particularly the corporate tax reform, to get a system which is simpler and promotes efficiency and makes it easier for businesses to compete if the world. third, then we have to -- that will create -- that will be enormous. third, then there is a infrastructure investment that needs to be made. this is very important because in the context of the kiped of budget deal we'll get where we'll spend less going forward as businesses, we have to think about what our values are with respect to what we'll spend money on. the most important things we can spend money on is infrastructure to again create -- make investments in the future rather than just short-term spending. and then twin that with important support for research, basic research, and for higher education as drew talked about. and for education. thos
Search Results 0 to 18 of about 19 (some duplicates have been removed)

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